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foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
, everybody, i'm martha maccallum here in "america's newsroom." what a story this is. gregg: incredible courage. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. listen to the hero of this story. her name is antoinette toff. she came face-to-face with the shooting suspect, michael brand done hill. >> oh i'm in the front office. he went outside to start shooting. [gunfire] can i run? >> can you get somewhere safe? >> yeah. i got to go. and he's coming back. >> put the phone down. >> okay. she said she is getting police to tell him to back off for you, okay? >> tell them to stop all movement. >> okay. okay. >> stop all movement now on the ground. stop all movement on the ground. he said don't care if he die. he have nothing to live for. he says he is not mentally stable. >> stay on the line with me. okay? put the phone down if you have to but don't put it on hold so i can't hear. martha: she not only calms him down but then she speaks to the police and becomes a intermediary in this situation. she convinces him to give himself up before hurting anybody. listen to this part. >> let me talk to them an
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
and the administration is absolutely right when they say they want and america wants inclusive tolerant institutions in egypt. the question is, how do build them, and we -- the way to build them is not to burn them down. that's why i think we should retain our strong rlelationship with the military. not because we condone it or agree with it, it's the only power in town. if we going rebuild egypts institution, it's better to rebuild from within than burn them down and start from scratch. simply put, the big state is better than no state. that's the only choice facing us nous. >> countries at odds with each other. israel and the non-secular people, the black costuming people, who really want a religious state's in people in northern ireland who want to be forever a part of britain and others who very much want to be a republic of ireland. here are here want sharia led, real islamic law, political power and other people who are just egyptians who want to live the way egyptians have lived for thousands of years. can they be co-habitating? is in a model for them to cohabitate that country? >> that's a q
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
on the studio on the upper west side. no longer there. only played at one theatre in america for two weeks. and there were lines around the block. >> john: i was at nyu back when that came out. back in the '80s, you and jim were all we were allowed to talk about. >> what it tells me about "from she's gonna have it," 27 years ago today until presently, somehow, of all of the films i've done, all over those three decades, it moved people. it has to. if someone is giving you their last $5, you did a movie. you did something. that connected them. and they never forgot it. >> john: that's the power of the media. for me, that's what film making is about. telling stories. >> john: you have an artistic professor of nyu's graduate film program for over ten years now. >> 15 teaching and five as artistic director. >> john: how did that lead you to getting into kick starter? >> well, i teach one day a week. 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. people sign up on my door for half an hour. i have lunch from 1:00 to 2:00. we have class from 2:00 to 5:00. and only teach third year director students. many of my students
in brazil. >> let me make it clear, the policy of the united states of america with respect to all settlements is that they are illegitimate. and we oppose settlements taking place at any time, not just the time of the... of the peace process. >> reporter: in a separate move, israel carried out a promise that led to the peace negotiations by releasing 26 palestinian prisoners. buses left a prison in central israel after nightfall. the inmates had been held on charges ranging from rock- throwing to deadly bombings. the israeli military shot down a rocket launched at a resort town near the egyptian border today. the attack targeted eilat on the red sea. officials said it's the first time israel's iron dome defense system had intercepted a rocket there. militants based in egypt's sinai peninsula claimed responsibility for the attack. another apparent u.s. drone strike in yemen killed two more militants late monday. it brings to 37 the number believed killed in the last two weeks amid warnings al qaeda in the arabian peninsula was planning attacks in the region. the group is considered
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
a political perspective, america does not want to touch the kind of mess in the middle east. theink that is just political context and reality of this. you asked whether any of us have regrets. regarding our support for democracy in the muslim brotherhood. let me be very clear. i know you know this. the three people sitting up here today have each been very clear eyed and very critical of what we saw as actions by the muslim brotherhood and president morsi that were undermining democratic prospects in egypt. president morsi issued a decree that set him above judicial review. he ran through a constitution that was asked visionary -- was exclusionary. were pushing ay law that would have eviscerated the judiciary. it would have clamped down public protests. civilld have nationalized society organizations in the country. i don't think any of us had any illusions about the trajectory that he was on and we all voice to those concerns. think, to no way i say that i am easily relaxed about the outcome in egypt. i think what happened on july 3 has sent a country further down the path toward
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
history, talking about the pentagon papers, the water gate scandal, more recently their top secret america piece -- series, the walter reed medical hospital series that won him the pulitzer. there's the question of like is there going to be an investment -- and is there an investment in had this digital age in terms of that kind of reporting, that kind of granularity, that kind of fact finding and that commitment to stories that may not get a lot of click-throughs at the beginning or ever but matter in terms of information and awareness. >> well, i think the answer is both yes and i hope so, and it has to be. a couple things. a lot of this is due -- a lot of the kinds of journalism that you are talking about is due to the commitment of the families and the people who own these institutions. as john said, the grahams. i was lucky to have worked for the grahams because "newsweek" where i worked for many years is owned by "the washington post" company. i had a lot of of company with him. the grahams were an inspiration. before that i worked in louisville for the bingham family that owned "the
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
to be the least aggrieved black man in america to be palatable to the wider electorate and that's what he did in 2008. we're now in 2013. he's been elected twice. it's the 50th anniversary. i don't see how he can speak without dealing directly with the issue of race without going there today. and then doing something else. not only talking about the issues that we kind of know how to address and know how to solve, vote rights, for example, we see was happening, we know how to organize. we know how to fight that. we have the tools and the laws in place to fight that. there are other things that are more complicated and more difficult to work on. the patterns of residential segregation that have led to schools in many parts of the country being segregated now as they were in 1970s or 1960s. that sort of thing is much more diffuse, much more complicated and that's what i hope i hear more about today not just from the president, but from other speakers as well. >> chris, to you gene's points the question of segregation in american society would seem to be settled but it's not you look at the stat
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
#mymarchdc. we want to hear your stories. >> it appears america is still not color blind. new study by tpeer research center, among blacks, jumps to 79% african-americans lag behind many whites 14% margin, 7 in 10 blacks are treated less fairly by police and courts. also this morning 50 years ago, voting rights a huge issue and remain so today. federal government suing state of texas over new id law which is discriminatory. >> texas is the only state that is discriminating in redistricting. in june, supreme court ruled to remove the -- to seek pre-clearance from the department of justice before making changes to election and redistricting laws. justice department is using a different part of the act in the texas case. now to the violent death of a community activist in d.c. >> police say someone shot timothy dawkins where he lived. the 24 year old studied to become a preacher. he had plans to run for ant commission e commissioner. >> he had an old soul. we traveled with kids to tennessee for training. we more examples especially black men. we lost out here. >> police don't have a suspect or
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
in the region. this is something that is going to require america's attention, hopefully the entire international community's attention. >> senator john mccain came on "new day" very strong on this. he believes the u.s.'s credibility in the region has been hurt, that a situation like syria, that he believes, there's been delay, and it has led to a bolds by the regime there, that in egypt that what many believe is a coup wasn't called a coup. >> i am sympathetic to senator mccain's passion for helping people work through what is an extraordinarily difficult and heart-breaking situation, but what i think the american people also expect me to do as president is to think through what we do from the perspective what is in our long-term national interest. sometimes what we've seen is folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff that does not turn out well, gets us mired in very difficult situations, can result in us being drawn in to very expensive, difficult, costly interventions that actually breed more resentment in the region. we have to think through strategically what is
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
. plus, hundreds of feet beneath a mcdonald's a hidden chamber where america stored nukes. >> this is constantly alarmed and there is a guard course protecting this facility. >> for decades it was a secret. >> the rumors have been around forever. >> there was a feeling that there was something going on down here. now, fox news takes you inside the lois los alamos nuclear tunnel. first from fox this wednesday night, the baby shot to death in his stroller. today, in court heard from a teenager who stood and watched as an older teen shot 13 month old santiago in the face. police call the younger teen an accomplice. prosecutors have asked him to testify as the older teen stands trial. both suspects face murder charges. this is the teenager on trial now. police say he tried to rob the mother on a street in southeast georgia back in march. they say the mom claimed she didn't have any money and that's when the teen shot her in the leg and in the ear and shot the baby in the head. one bullet. between the eyes. but defense attorneys have suggested the mother had a financial interes
in that he believed that business in america should serve some point. there should be an and the business. it didn't message you have to have a broad social and that there should be some point to it, which automatically testing wishes and for most of our business folks from today. he had kind of an enlightened sense of what this is journalism could be about. >> he didn't mind criticism of business. >> that's right. let's face it, when it's 1933 and its 1934, it's kind of hard to defend business. he had a henry hoover conception of heroic business, but in the early part of the depression it was almost impossible for any honest person to continue to take that line. so fortune and its writers including agee begin to confront some of the more unseemly side of the country. so fortune ran pieces about -- they ran a piece about the tennessee valley authority, which agee wrote and which luce told him was told there was one of the best things i've ever been printed since fortune had been around. so they were brought and pragmatically open to new deal reforms. and i keep mentioning dwight macdonald
intervention. it believes the rebels will not support america's interest if they were to come to power now. this came out to a letter that general dempsey sent. he said the military is clearly taking out the syrian air force and shifting the balance. michigan republican congressman justin amash held a town hall meeting recently in michigan. he touched on topics like health care and government surveillance. he offered an amendment that would bar the and as a from collecting phone and data records from citizens who are not subject of investigation. the amendment was opposed by speaker john boehner and the white house and ultimately defeated. his town hall back in michigan lasted about one hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. ben, he is my chief of staff. he does not just work for me. he is primarily in our grand rapids office, and you can find that on my website, and we have a satellite office in battle creek, so if there is something you would like to schedule, you can contact our grand rapids office, and we will make sure we will have someone to meet with you as well. jordan
to silicon valley companies like that, especially google, america's most popular sport and the world's most powerful internet company. could be an interesting conversation. >> absolutely. thanks so much, christine. >> it's got to happen, it's the future. eventually everything will wind up having some digital things. we'll be watching two screens at once. we know t it's a question of how. christine romans we know what she's doing today, little investment decisions. >>> when we come back, climate change, another massive issue, they say we're causing it, is it real? according to an international panel of scientists, grave consequences could be coming. >>> also coming up is senator ted cruz eyeing the white house in 2016? a lot of people are questioning whether he can legally run and a lot of people are putting that to rest. >>> also why the texas lawmaker tells cnn we are in the middle of silly season in politics a head. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
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